ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio

Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).

(via fishingboatproceeds)

photography

thebeatlesordie:

mickjaggugh:

my favorite story ever is that on mick jagger’s 25th birthday in ‘68 he invited a bunch of celebrities and played jumpin’ jack flash and sympathy for the devil n everyone liked it but then paul mccartney slipped the dj a copy of hey jude/revolution and everyone went crazy and told them to play it again and for the rest of the night mick was super pissed bc paul mccartney outshone him at his own party 

paul u bitch

(via youmakemefeelfun)

SHELBY

we-are-star-stuff:

This is maybe one of the greatest wild life phenomenon on the planet ever captured on lens!
In the sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, a massive congregation of Munkiana Devil Rays, relative of manta rays, was captured by a German photographer Florian Schulz, displaying unusual event which he dubbed as the Flight of the Rays.
But as this wonderful perspective shows, for all the individuals leaping out that are visible at sea level, there are many more below the surface. The jaw-dropping image below shows only a quarter of the whole scene.
No one knows why the rays gather like this, whether to mate, herd prey or migrate or just for the sheer joy of being together.

we-are-star-stuff:

This is maybe one of the greatest wild life phenomenon on the planet ever captured on lens!

In the sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, a massive congregation of Munkiana Devil Rays, relative of manta rays, was captured by a German photographer Florian Schulz, displaying unusual event which he dubbed as the Flight of the Rays.

But as this wonderful perspective shows, for all the individuals leaping out that are visible at sea level, there are many more below the surface. The jaw-dropping image below shows only a quarter of the whole scene.

No one knows why the rays gather like this, whether to mate, herd prey or migrate or just for the sheer joy of being together.

(via sarahsmodernlife)

upgraders:

It’s weird that pirates would go from shore to shore looking for buried treasure when the real treasure was in the friendships they were making

(via veguntold)

arandomobject:

"I want a plus-sized princess!"

image

"I want a princess who can’t sing!"

image

"I want a princess who can fight!"

image

"I want a non-traditional princess!"

image

In conclusion Fiona is great and just because Disney didn’t make her doesn’t mean she doesn’t exist.

(Source: arandomobject, via theonlyexceptionx5)